FORTHCOMING NCIS EVENTS

(ALL WELCOME - SHARE WITH YOUR FRIENDS AND COLLEAGUES!) 
 

"THE EARLY EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY APOCALYPSE: HOW THE UNFORESEEN ACTIONS OF A FEW PEOPLE FOREVER CHANGED OUR WORLD OF WAR, PLAGUE, AND SMALLPOX"

By Invited Lecture: Margaret DeLacy, Ph.D.

SATURDAY 17 APRIL 2021                               

11AM PACIFIC TIME / 2PM EASTERN DAYLIGHT TIME / 7PM BRITISH SUMMER TIME / 8PM CENTRAL EUROPEAN TIME
 

For the Zoom code, please email us on info@ncis.org by Friday 16 April, citing lecture title or presenter in the subject line.
 
Intro: For our first NCIS virtual event of 2021 we are delighted to welcome our invited lecturer Dr Margaret DeLacy, one of the founding mothers of NCIS.
Abstract: The early eighteenth century saw a series of interlinked disasters in Europe. The closing years of the Little Ice Age brought unpredictable famines. Dynasties failed as smallpox spread through royal households. Global trade and imperial wars carried plague and other diseases across Europe as mercenary armies transformed empires and ravaged European communities. Yet a series of fortuitous events fostered a few personal connections that spanned the western world and would transform health and medicine forever. In this session, we will sample some of these encounters, and interrogate their causes and outcomes.
Margaret DeLacy is the author of several articles and three books including The Germ of An Idea: Contagionism, Religion, and Society in Britain, 1660-1730, and Contagionism Catches On: Medical Ideology in Britain, 1730-1800.  She received her Ph.D. in English History from Princeton University. She lives in Portland, Oregon, where she is the president of the Northwest Independent Scholars Association.

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"CHRONOLOGY OF A TRANSNATIONAL SOCIAL MOVEMENT: JAPANESE AMERICAN A-BOMB SURVIVORS AND THEIR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER (RAFU SHIMPO)"

Dr Gloria R. Montebruno Saller, Ph.D.

SATURDAY 15 MAY 2021                               

11AM PACIFIC TIME / 2PM EASTERN DAYLIGHT TIME / 7PM BRITISH SUMMER TIME / 8PM CENTRAL EUROPEAN TIME
 

For the Zoom code, please email us on info@ncis.org by Friday 14 May latest citing lecture title or presenter in the subject line.
 
INTRO: This is the first in our series of presentations by recipients of NCIS grants. Dr Montebruno Saller was awarded an NCIS Research Grant in Fall 2020 in support of this project. Dr. Saller was able to continue her research in spite of restrictions caused by the Covid pandemic; she is particularly keen to present this work-in-progress to us in order to gain valuable feedback, and to crystallize her research questions in the light of the data collected so far.
Abstract: The majority of Japanese American Hibakusha were born on the West Coast of the United States and Hawaii. They were in Hiroshima during World War II and returned to the USA between 1948 and 1956. In my book, I focus on Japanese American Hibakusha who were born and/or reside(d) in California and Hawaii. To provide a chronologically accurate timeline of these survivors’ social and political activities, I chose the Rafu Shimpō to help me in my endeavor. Through the Rafu Shimpō’s correspondents’ articles, (1) I will be able to build a chronology of the Japanese American Atomic Bomb Survivors’ political and social activism from the 1960s through current times; (2) I will  bring to light how these Japanese American Atomic Bomb Survivors confronted both the USA and Japanese governments to obtain medical relief/ benefits, and even though they failed in the USA, they were successful in Japan; (3) I will show how Japanese American Atomic Bomb Survivors contributed to the peace movement and the movement to abolish nuclear weapons through community engagements and peace talks in North America; (4) I will ensure that these Japanese American Atomic Bomb Survivors’ personal narratives can be employed to support the argument against the use of nuclear weapons in any conflict.
Gloria R. Montebruno Saller is an Independent Research Scholar in Japan Studies. Born in Italy, she moved to the United States to pursue her doctoral degree in East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Southern California where she received her doctoral degree. She taught courses in Japanese language and culture, Women’s Studies, and Global Studies at the University of Southern California; California State University, Long Beach; California State University, Fullerton; University of California, Riverside; and at the University of La Verne. She has presented her research at conferences worldwide and published in several academic journals. Dr. Montebruno Saller's current research focuses on the history of Japanese and Japanese American Atomic Bomb survivors residing in the United States and their social activism through CABSUS (Committee of Atomic Bomb Survivors, United States) and ASA (American Society of Hiroshima-Nagasaki A-Bomb Survivors).

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ACADEMIC BLOGS
 
Valerie Abrahamsen D.Th.  Blog posts relating to the past such as women in antiquity and early church history: https://www.wisdomwordsppf.org/blog/
 
Helen Kara, Ph.D. Research and evaluation in higher education, social care, health, and the third sector: https://helenkara.com/blog/
 
Cathy Mazak, Ph.D. Academic writing coach for womxn: https://www.cathymazak.com/blog/
 
Kathleen Stein-Smith, Ph.DForeign language deficit and related French and foreign language issues.  Language Matters: https://kathleensteinsmith.wordpress.com/
 
If you would like your own academic blog featured here, please contact us on info@ncis.org.
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FREE RESOURCES FOR INDEPENDENT SCHOLARS
 
Free resources during the Covid epidemic: https://library.lasalle.edu/covidfree?fbclid=IwAR0Ygcv9OWUMHs9OMfc8Gl5ix-Xnpr3UV3cbkVrc3vKbkyBmH8wGVN4Fcd8
 
Project Muse: Open access https://about.muse.jhu.edu/muse/open-access-overview/
 
How to Thrive in Academia https://www.facultydiversity.org/fallaccess?fbclid=IwAR0Ygcv9OWUMHs9OMfc8Gl5ix-Xnpr3UV3cbkVrc3vKbkyBmH8wGVN4Fcd8
 
Women's History Month https://womenshistorymonth.gov/?fbclid=IwAR1iUvi_e-551q1dVsU7ZpZMtZAJ2r4QcAflRJvn_zHfw46o9pVDcf6i_hA
 
If there's a broken link, or you know of more free resources for indies, please email us on info@ncis.org.
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"STUDY BUDDY" PLATFORMS
(Team up with one or more researchers for (usually silent) writing sessions)
 
FocusMate 50-minute 1-2-1 sessions. Can specify preferred gender of study partner. Up to 3 sessions per week for free.  www.focusmate.com
 
FIRE-UK Writing Group (for UK-based indies) - contact Vanessa Mongey vanessa.mongey@ncis.org
 
MoocLab Study Buddy https://www.mooclab.club/study_buddy/
 
If you can recommend other platforms, please let us know on info@ncis.org.
 
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Also available TO NCIS MEMBERS

(by logging in to Members Only area):

 

Podcast: “Publishing Your Thesis”
This podcast on “Publishing Your Thesis” is the result of an NCIS webinar featuring panelists Jess Farr-Cox (academic editor), Dr Lyle Skains (creative digital writer) and Dr Jasmine Shadrack (music sociologist).

The questions tackled in this podcast include:

  •     whether to publishing your research as journal articles or as a book…or both!
  •      the emotional effect of revisiting your thesis
  •      the transition from thesis to book
  •      when to reach out to a publisher
  •     personal writing style: academic or narrative
  •     digital vs. print publications

 

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